General Blog

What to Expect at Your Marriage-Based Green Card Interview
  • By: Christine Limongello
  • Published: July 23, 2021

In order for your foreign spouse to live, work, and pursue an education in the United States, they must obtain a marriage-based green card. The most stressful part of obtaining a green card is the interview. Immigration officials will conduct an interview to establish the validity of your marriage. They will ask a series of questions as well as look at any documents or records you’ve provided. The entire purpose of the process is to verify that the marriage isn’t a sham used to circumvent immigration laws. An evaluation of your marriage will begin the moment you step into a USCIS office. The immigration official will look at your demeanor as an individual and as a couple the entire time you are in the office. You and your spouse will…Read More

What Documents May I Need for My DACA Application?
  • By: Christine Limongello
  • Published: July 16, 2021

When you submit a DACA application, you must include evidence demonstrating that you are eligible. The documents you need may vary based on your personal background. Some documents that you will need include:   Proof of Your Identity In order to prove your identity, you must submit one of the following: Birth certificate with photo identification. Passport or I.D. from your country of origin School I.D. with photo Military I.D. with photo Any U.S. immigration document with your photo on it Proof You Came to the United States Before Your 16th Birthday In order to be eligible for DACA, you must show that you came to the U.S. before your 16th birthday. The documents you use to establish this should be dated and have been obtained in the United States.…Read More

5 Tips for Making the Most of Your Immigration Consultation
  • By: Christine Limongello
  • Published: July 9, 2021

If you have an immigration issue and you want the help of an experienced attorney, you should arrange a consultation with Serving Immigrants. At your consultation, we will discuss your issues and explore your options. There are some steps you can take prior to the consultation to get the most out of the meeting.   Gather Documents The most important thing you can do prior to your consultation is to gather all the necessary documents so you can provide copies to the attorney. These documents may include things such as your birth certificate, visas or visa applications, passports, marriage certificates, and any documents you were given when you entered the United States. If you have a criminal record, then copies of all police and court documents will be necessary.  …Read More

FAQs About T Visas
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: June 18, 2021

In 2000, Congress created the T nonimmigrant visa to help combat human trafficking and provide some immigration relief to individuals who had been trafficked into the United States.   What is a T Visa? The T visa is a type of immigration relief allowing survivors of human trafficking and their family members to temporarily remain and work in the United States. The T visa can be a path to a green card down the road.   Why Should Someone Apply for a T Visa? A T visa allows for four years of lawful immigration status and employment authorization. If the T visa holder meets eligibility, they may be able to apply for a green card. T visa holders may be eligible for federal refugee benefits, which include cash assistance, food…Read More

Documents Needed for Your VAWA Petition
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: June 11, 2021

When you are seeking a green card under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), there are a number of different requirements that must be met. To fulfill most of these requirements, you will need the proper documentation. Here are some of the documents you may need for your petition.   Relationship to the Abuser A VAWA petitioner must show that they are, or were, married to their abuser. It must also be shown that the marriage was legal and that any previous marriages had been dissolved due to death or divorce. The documents you can use to prove this requirement include: Marriage certificates Death certificates related to any previous marriage. Divorce decrees related to the marriage to the abuser or any previous marriages.   Status of the Abuser A VAWA…Read More

Your Guide To Nonimmigrant Visas
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: June 2, 2021

  If you are a citizen of a foreign country, you will need a visa to enter the United States. There are two broad categories that visas fall under: Nonimmigrant visa Immigrant visa If you want to temporarily work in the United States, you will need a nonimmigrant visa. You are here to work rather than to move to this country. There are different employment groups and types of visas. Exchange Visa - This is a “J” visa. You will see these associated with schools. University professors may teach at a school for a semester. And they will be traveling to a foreign country to do so. Because they will be working and getting paid, they would be applying for this visa. Temporary Employment - This is your visa for…Read More

4 Reasons to Hire an Attorney for Your Marriage-Based Visa Application
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: May 25, 2021

To apply for a marriage-based visa, you are not required to have an attorney. However, an attorney can be helpful, and there are a few important reasons why you should consider hiring one.   Exploring Your Options An experienced immigration attorney can help you explore your visa options and determine which path is right for you. Maybe a marriage-based visa isn’t the best course of action. Maybe, if you aren’t married yet, you should try for a fiancé visa. You can discuss your needs with the attorney, and they can help you make the right decision.   Handling the Paperwork As with any visa application, there is a great deal of paperwork involved in a marriage-based visa application. The forms can be confusing, and having an attorney to make sure…Read More

Know The Difference Between Inadmissible and Removable
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: May 2, 2021

  The difference between these two terms is simple: inadmissible is used when someone is denied entry into the United States; removable refers to someone who is already in the country. They may fall into one of these categories: Living in the U.S. legally (they possess a nonimmigrant visa or a green card) They are undocumented (no green card or nonimmigrant visa) and are here illegally Why are these two terms important for you to know? It’s because of what they have in common. Regardless of whether you are inadmissible or removable, you will not be allowed to live in the United States.  Inadmissible  This applies when you are trying to become a legal permanent resident (a green card holder). It MAY apply to legal permanent residents who reenter the…Read More

4 Reasons to Consider Serving Immigrants for Your Immigration Needs
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: April 22, 2021

Hiring an immigration attorney is a personal choice. You're not required to have an attorney, and there are a number of different attorneys out there. Serving Immigrants is uniquely suited to help you with your immigration needs for a number of important reasons.   Experience The team at Serving Immigrants has years of experience handling a variety of immigration issues. They know the process and how to handle each step. Immigration processes can be complex, so it is important to have someone who has been through it multiple times. Immigration petitions often involve mountains of paperwork and strict requirements that must be met. The team at Serving Immigrants knows how to work through the paperwork and help you collect the evidence you need for success.   Focused Practice  Some law…Read More

Family-Based Immigration in the United States
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: April 15, 2021

Under United States immigration law, a limited number of family-based immigrant visas are awarded to foreign nationals every year. Family immigration is the primary basis for immigration to the United States. It accounts for approximately 65% of legal immigration.   Eligibility for a Family Visa There are two groups who are eligible for family visas: Immediate Relatives—includes 1) spouses of U.S. citizens; 2) children of U.S. citizens who are under the age of 21; 3) orphans adopted abroad; 4) orphans to be adopted in the U.S. by U.S. citizens, and 4) parents of U.S. citizens who are over 21. Family Preference Categories—includes 1) unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens and their children; 2) spouses, minor children, and unmarried sons and daughters over 21 of Legal Permanent Residents; 3) married…Read More

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