General Blog

Documents Needed for Your VAWA Petition
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: June 11, 2021

When you are seeking a green card under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), there are a number of different requirements that must be met. To fulfill most of these requirements, you will need the proper documentation. Here are some of the documents you may need for your petition.   Relationship to the Abuser A VAWA petitioner must show that they are, or were, married to their abuser. It must also be shown that the marriage was legal and that any previous marriages had been dissolved due to death or divorce. The documents you can use to prove this requirement include: Marriage certificates Death certificates related to any previous marriage. Divorce decrees related to the marriage to the abuser or any previous marriages.   Status of the Abuser A VAWA…Read More

  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: June 10, 2021

Si eres un ciudadano de un país extranjero, necesitarás una visa para entrar a los Estados Unidos. Hay dos (2) categorías generales en las que se incluyen las visas: 1. Visa no-inmigrante 2. Visa Inmigrante Si quieres un trabajo temporal en los Estados Unidos, necesitarás una visa no inmigrante. Tu estas aquí para trabajar en vez de cambiarte a este país. Hay diferentes grupos de empleos y tipos de visas. Visa de intercambio - Esta es una Visa “J”.Verás estas asociadas con las escuelas. Los profesores de universidades pueden enseñar en escuelas por un semestre y viajaran a un país extranjero para hacerlo. Porque ellos estarán trabajando y siendo pagados, ellos estarían solicitando esta visa. Visa de Medios - Estas son “I” Visas. Son para los medios y la prensa.…Read More

  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: June 9, 2021

If you are a citizen of a foreign country, you will need a visa to enter the United States. There are two (2) broad categories that visas fall under: 1. Nonimmigrant visa 2. Immigrant visa If you want to temporarily work in the United States, you will need a nonimmigrant visa. You are here to work rather than to move to this country. There are different employment groups and types of visas. Exchange Visa -This is a“J” visa.Youwillseetheseassociatedwith schools. University professors may teach at a school for a semester and they will be traveling to a foreign country to do so. Because they will be working and getting paid, they would be applying for this visa. Temporary Employment - This is your visa for temporary employment. B Visas - Temporary…Read More

Your Guide To Nonimmigrant Visas
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: June 2, 2021

  If you are a citizen of a foreign country, you will need a visa to enter the United States. There are two broad categories that visas fall under: Nonimmigrant visa Immigrant visa If you want to temporarily work in the United States, you will need a nonimmigrant visa. You are here to work rather than to move to this country. There are different employment groups and types of visas. Exchange Visa - This is a “J” visa. You will see these associated with schools. University professors may teach at a school for a semester. And they will be traveling to a foreign country to do so. Because they will be working and getting paid, they would be applying for this visa. Temporary Employment - This is your visa for…Read More

4 Reasons to Hire an Attorney for Your Marriage-Based Visa Application
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: May 25, 2021

To apply for a marriage-based visa, you are not required to have an attorney. However, an attorney can be helpful, and there are a few important reasons why you should consider hiring one.   Exploring Your Options An experienced immigration attorney can help you explore your visa options and determine which path is right for you. Maybe a marriage-based visa isn’t the best course of action. Maybe, if you aren’t married yet, you should try for a fiancé visa. You can discuss your needs with the attorney, and they can help you make the right decision.   Handling the Paperwork As with any visa application, there is a great deal of paperwork involved in a marriage-based visa application. The forms can be confusing, and having an attorney to make sure…Read More

  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: May 10, 2021

La diferencia entre estos dos términos es sencilla: inadmisible es usada cuando a una persona se le es negada la entrada a los Estados Unidos; Retirable se refiere a una persona que ya se encuentra en el país. Pueden caer en una de estas categorías: Viviendo en los Estados Unidos legalmente (Ellos poseen una visa no-inmigrante o Green Card) Ellos están indocumentados (No tienen visa No-inmigrante o una Green Card) y están aquí ilegalmente. ¿Por qué es importante que sepas sobre estos dos (2) términos? Es debido a lo que estas tienen en común. Independientemente de si es inadmisible o retirable, usted no tendrá permitido vivir en los Estados Unidos. Inadmisible Este aplica cuando estás intentando convertirte en un residente permanente legal (un titular de Green Card). Puede aplicar a…Read More

  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: May 9, 2021

The difference between these two terms is simple: inadmissible is used when someone is denied entry into the United States; removable refers to someone who is already in the country. They may fall into one of these categories: Living in the U.S. legally (they possess a nonimmigrant visa or a green card) They are undocumented (no green card or nonimmigrant visa) and are here illegally Why are these two (2) terms important for you to know? It’s because of what they have in common. Regardless of whether you are inadmissible or removable, you will not be allowed to live in the United States. Inadmissible This applies when you are trying to become a legal permanent resident (a green card holder). It MAY apply to legal permanent residents who reenter the…Read More

Know The Difference Between Inadmissible and Removable
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: May 2, 2021

  The difference between these two terms is simple: inadmissible is used when someone is denied entry into the United States; removable refers to someone who is already in the country. They may fall into one of these categories: Living in the U.S. legally (they possess a nonimmigrant visa or a green card) They are undocumented (no green card or nonimmigrant visa) and are here illegally Why are these two terms important for you to know? It’s because of what they have in common. Regardless of whether you are inadmissible or removable, you will not be allowed to live in the United States.  Inadmissible  This applies when you are trying to become a legal permanent resident (a green card holder). It MAY apply to legal permanent residents who reenter the…Read More

4 Reasons to Consider Serving Immigrants for Your Immigration Needs
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: April 22, 2021

Hiring an immigration attorney is a personal choice. You're not required to have an attorney, and there are a number of different attorneys out there. Serving Immigrants is uniquely suited to help you with your immigration needs for a number of important reasons.   Experience The team at Serving Immigrants has years of experience handling a variety of immigration issues. They know the process and how to handle each step. Immigration processes can be complex, so it is important to have someone who has been through it multiple times. Immigration petitions often involve mountains of paperwork and strict requirements that must be met. The team at Serving Immigrants knows how to work through the paperwork and help you collect the evidence you need for success.   Focused Practice  Some law…Read More

Family-Based Immigration in the United States
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: April 15, 2021

Under United States immigration law, a limited number of family-based immigrant visas are awarded to foreign nationals every year. Family immigration is the primary basis for immigration to the United States. It accounts for approximately 65% of legal immigration.   Eligibility for a Family Visa There are two groups who are eligible for family visas: Immediate Relatives—includes 1) spouses of U.S. citizens; 2) children of U.S. citizens who are under the age of 21; 3) orphans adopted abroad; 4) orphans to be adopted in the U.S. by U.S. citizens, and 4) parents of U.S. citizens who are over 21. Family Preference Categories—includes 1) unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens and their children; 2) spouses, minor children, and unmarried sons and daughters over 21 of Legal Permanent Residents; 3) married…Read More

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