General Blog

  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: April 10, 2021

Ser arrestado o detenido puede ser un evento abrumador, estresante y significativo en su vida. Aunque el tema de ser arrestado por el Servicio de Inmigración y Control de Aduanas (ICE) puede ser incómodo de pensar, aún debe comprender sus derechos. Entonces, si es arrestado o detenido, puede confiar en el ejercicio de los derechos que sabe que tiene. Permanecer en silencio Tienes derecho a permanecer en silencio. Y esto puede resultar sorprendentemente difícil de hacer. La razón es que es probable que desee explicar cómo salir de la situación en la que se encuentra. Si cree que lo han detenido por error, es posible que desee expresarlo. Si no tiene una explicación válida de por qué fue detenido, no mienta ni haga pasar documentos falsos. Concéntrese en permanecer en…Read More

  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: April 9, 2021

Being arrested or detained can be an overwhelming, stressful, and significant event in your life. Though the subject of being arrested by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) may be uncomfortable to think about, you should still understand your rights. So if you are arrested or detained, you can rely on exercising the rights that you know you have. Remain Silent You do have the right to remain silent. And this can be surprisingly difficult to do. The reason being is that you will likely have the desire to explain your way out of the situation you are in. If you think you’ve been detained mistakenly, you might wish to express this. Should you not have a valid explanation for why you were detained, do not lie or pass off fake…Read More

Biden May Reopen Work Visa Program
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: April 8, 2021

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the Trump administration put a ban on certain work visas. Trump had frozen new green cards during the pandemic, arguing that the clampdown was important to safeguard the United States economy, protect jobs, and for public health reasons. Trump also halted temporary work visas for skilled workers, managers, and au pairs, including H-1B, H-2B, H-4, L-1, and J categories.   Revoking the Freeze In February 2021, President Biden revoked the freeze on many visas and green cards, stating that the freeze was not in the best interests of the United States. Biden also noted that the freeze hurt industries and families and noted that it prevented qualified non-U.S. residents from entering the country. While Biden did not take steps to reopen some temporary work visas, the…Read More

Protect Yourself By Knowing Your Rights
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: April 5, 2021

  Being arrested or detained can be an overwhelming, stressful, and significant event in your life. Though the subject of being arrested by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) may be uncomfortable to think about, you should still understand your rights. So if you are arrested or detained, you can rely on exercising the rights that you know you have.  Remain Silent You do have the right to remain silent. And this can be surprisingly difficult to do. The reason being is that you will likely have the desire to explain your way out of the situation you are in. If you think you’ve been detained mistakenly, you might wish to express this. Should you not have a valid explanation for why you were detained, do not lie or pass off…Read More

Differences Between a Fiance Visa and a Marriage-Based Visa
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: April 1, 2021

If you are a United States citizen and your fiancé lives overseas, you have an important decision to make. Should you bring your fiancé over to the U.S., or should you marry them overseas and then bring them over as your spouse? Factors such as timing, your personal preference as to where to hold the wedding, and expense can all play a part in your decision.   Fiance Visa A fiancé visa, also known as a K-1 visa, is issued to a foreign national who is engaged and intends to marry a U.S. citizen. Before filing for a fiancé visa, a couple must show that they have seen each other in person within the last two (2) years. The foreign partner must marry the U.S. citizen within ninety (90) days…Read More

  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: March 10, 2021

Aunque la gente pueda pensar que los términos residente permanente y ciudadano pueden usarse indistintamente, no significan lo mismo. Comprender las diferencias y cómo se aplican a usted es el primer paso para conocer sus derechos y responsabilidades. Por ejemplo, bajo ciertas circunstancias, puede ser deportado incluso si es residente permanente. Para protegerse, comprenda estos términos y el significado de cada uno. Un residente permanente legal Se trata de alguien a quien se le ha otorgado el derecho a vivir en los Estados Unidos de manera indefinida, lo que significa que no hay un cronograma de cuándo expirará. Para ser claros, eso no significa que no se pueda revocar, pero lo repasaremos en un momento. Estas personas tienen una tarjeta de residente permanente, comúnmente conocida como "tarjeta verde". Esta es…Read More

What Is A Permanent Resident?
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: March 2, 2021

Although people may think that the terms permanent resident and citizen can be used interchangeably, they do not mean the same thing. Understanding the differences and how they apply to you, is the first step to knowing your rights and responsibilities. For example, under certain circumstances, you can be deported even if you are a permanent resident. To protect yourself, understand these terms and the meaning of each. A Lawful Permanent Resident This is someone who has been granted the right to live in the United States indefinitely—meaning there is no timeline when it will expire. To be clear, that doesn’t mean it cannot be revoked, but we will go over that in a moment. These people have a Permanent Resident Card, commonly referred to as a “green card.” This…Read More

Ready To Become A US Citizen? This Is What Needs To Happen
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: March 2, 2021

If you are one of the millions of people who are living in the United States without legal citizenship, you are missing out on a number of important legal benefits and protections. For those who plan to remain in the US permanently, becoming a citizen makes a lot of sense. While it can take some time and effort, it will be worth it in the end. The specific process for becoming a US citizen will depend on a number of factors, including your current legal status, how long you have been in the country, and more. The following steps, however, will provide you with a good outline of what will need to happen in order to become a citizen. Looking At Your Eligibility The first thing you will want to…Read More

Motions To Reopen Removal Orders
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: March 2, 2021

Navigating through the immigration process can be extremely complex and frustrating. This is made even worse if you have already had an order of removal issued against you by a judge. This order may cause you to be detained by ICE, deported, and make it so you can’t seek out immigration relief, petition for a status that would let you stay, or take other actions that could help your situation. If you or a loved one is facing this situation, you will eventually have to file a motion to reopen removal orders. This will help you to be able to get your case looked at again, so you can argue for the right to stay in the country legally. While successfully filing this type of motion is not always easy,…Read More

4 Ways to Show Good Moral Character in Your VAWA Petition
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: March 1, 2021

When submitting a petition under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), one of the requirements is that you establish that you are a person of good moral character. Good moral character has an ambiguous definition in the Immigration and Nationality Act [hereinafter, the “INA”], but there are some specific items that officials look for to determine whether a person is a person of good moral character. There are a number of different ways you can prove that you are a person of good moral character, including, but not limited to, the following Police Clearance Records Submitting police clearance records from anywhere that you have lived for at least six (6) months in the past three (3) years can help establish that you are a person of good moral character assuming…Read More

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